The Ancient Wand of Syria

In a 2007-2009 excavation at Tell Qarassa, southern Syria, a team of archaeologists found some kind of fragment which possibly from a 'wand'. The mysterious object, made of cow bone and was about 4.7 inches (12 centimeters) long and thought to date from the late ninth millenium BC. It was uncovered from a funerary layer and has the depictions of two human faces engraved on it. The relic's purpose and symbolism remain a mystery.

It is a unique object, and the archaeologists suspect that it "probably depicted powerful supernatural beings". Two natural-looking faces, with eyes closed, were carved into the bone, though the wand was intentionally broken at both ends, with more faces likely originally adorning the staff.

"The find is very unusual. It's unique. The wand, which was likely used in a long-lost funeral ritual, is one of the only naturalistic depictions of human faces from this time and place," said study co-author Frank Braemer, an archaeologist at the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in France. 

Interestingly, the wand was found near a burial site where thirty headless skeletons were discovered previously.

Source:
Fortean Times Magazine Vol. 314 May 2014: "Left by An Ancient Harry Potter?"
Fortean Times Magazine Vol. 314 May 2014: "Left by An Ancient Harry Potter?" page 17
The Ancient Wand of Syria The Ancient Wand of Syria Reviewed by Tripzibit on 14:57 Rating: 5

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